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property auctions IN ITALY

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property auctions IN ITALYProperty Auctions in Italy…

… a few facts and tips.

An unfinished hotel and empty swimming pool sit sadly on the lush hillside of Pitigliano in Tuscany, where they should have welcomed the holidaymakers who flock to central Italy. The Tosteto spa was seized in 2010, according to a local court order. Since then, six auctions have failed to attract a buyer for the Tosteto spa, partly because the original developer still holds rights to the land.

For a seventh auction this month, the valuation for the Tosteto spa has been cut to 4.6 million euros from 8.9 million euros at its first auction. There is already an eighth auction scheduled for October, suggesting the sellers are not hopeful. Read more

What you absolutely must understand before you buy a property in Italy!

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What you absolutely must understand before you buy a property in Italy!

before you buy a property in Italy

When you visit a country for a holiday the cultural differences are charming and exciting and ultimately do not affect your life. This changes dramatically when you move to, or invest financially, in that country.

You may have already bought a property in your own country. Maybe you are English and the estate agent passed all relevant information to your lawyer to process the purchase, maybe you are American and your independent buying agent was fully qualified to deal with the process and very aware of the ease with which litigation takes place in the USA. In both cases, the most risk free and secure method for you, as a buyer has become the assumed and probably the only way in which you can purchase that property. We take for granted that our interests are so well protected that it is very difficult to unknowingly make a mistake. Read more

Review of Italian and EU Divorce Law

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An introduction to Italian and EU Divorce Law

Many of our clients, friends and family members are part of a cross-cultural relationship and for the most part it is an enriching and beautiful experience but it can also difficult to manage. When it comes to marriage and children it is wise to speak to experts both for emotional support and legal support. Regrettably, international separations and divorces are becoming more common. Italian and EU Divorce Law

Obviously, people don’t enter in to married life thinking about where the best location for a divorce would be. However, where couples choose to divorce can have a major impact on both parties’ financial health, so getting it right is very important. Delays in deciding this could result in a disastrous outcome.

Changes to Italian Divorce Law

In May, 2015 Italy introduced the so-called ‘quickie divorce’ law, which cut the amount of time it takes to get a divorce from three years to as little as six months. The new Italian legislation cuts the time it takes to get a divorce to six months in uncontested cases and a year in contested cases.

While the new law still retains a two-step process – separation and divorce – there are three important changes:

  1. In the case of separazione consensuale – consensual separation – requested by both partners, the period of legal separation is now six months. After the six-month separation, which begins once the couple has filed an application for separation in court, the couple may file for divorce.
  2. In the case of separazione giudiziale – judicial separation – only one partner is requesting a divorce, or the couple contest issues such as child custody, division of assets (including property) or alimony arrangements, the parties have to wait 12 months to file for divorce following a court application for separation. If the procedure of separation is still pending following the 12-month period, perhaps for example because parties cannot agree on financial and other aspects of the separation, each party will be entitled to file for divorce. In this case, the processes for separation and divorce will be merged and handled by the judge appointed to rule over the judicial separation.
  3. The new law is applicable to separation cases that are currently pending. So, those who have already filed for separation will benefit from shorter divorce procedure times.

The European Union Divorce Law

The EU Divorce Law Pact or Rome III Regulation aims at implementing enhanced cooperation in the area of the law applicable to divorce and legal separation.  Essentially, this EU divorce law allows expat couples in Italy – and mixed marriage couples, where one partner is Italian and the other not – to choose either the divorce laws of Italy, or the laws of the country where the couple previously lived or the country of their nationality. The decision of which country’s law will apply, needs to be made before divorce proceedings begin.

The Rome III Regulation was adopted by 15 countries including Italy. The UK opted out – so

If a couple does not stipulate an applicable country law, divorce procedures will be governed by Italian courts and legislation if a couple is ordinarily resident in Italy or one partner is resident in Italy and starts proceedings here. However, if the other partner, for example, returns to the UK for six months or more and starts proceedings there before Italian proceedings begin, UK courts and law will govern the divorce.

Another aspect to consider in the choice of divorce law is matrimonial regimes. UK courts often split assets owned by a couple 50/50, whereas Italian courts look more closely at what belongs to whom. This is because when they get married, couples in Italy may choose between a matrimonial regime of shared ownership, comunione dei beni or separate ownership separazione dei beni of their worldly goods in the event of divorce or death.

Unless otherwise stipulated in an agreement, which can be made at the start of a marriage or at any time during a marriage, comunione dei beni is regarded as the default matrimonial regime. Expat couples married elsewhere but resident in Italy are regarded as being married according to this regime. In the comunione dei beni regime, property acquired by the couple during their marriage, whether individually or together, forms part of the couples’ shared ownership. In the event of a divorce, these assets will be split 50/50.

However, there are exceptions. For example, property acquired by a partner prior to the marriage, or property acquired after the marriage as a gift or an inheritance would not be split in the case of a divorce. The choice of matrimonial regimes can therefore have an important impact on choice of applicable law.

Consider the case of an English couple who married in the UK 12 years ago. Since then, the wife has inherited a significant sum of money as well as a house in Italy from her parents. 4 years ago, the husband persuaded the wife that they should move to Italy to live in the wife’s inherited property. Then, after 12 months, the husband moved back to the UK where he issued divorce proceedings. The UK court gave the husband 50% of all the couples’ assets. The Italian courts would have treated the inherited assets as belonging solely to the wife.

Each case is different. There are many issues that need to be taken in to account and at a very stressful time. Which applicable law to choose, requires very careful thought and consideration. An Experienced lawyer will be familiar with cross-border cases, and the complexities which make these divorces so difficult.

Please note, any statement made in this review is intended to be a general practical introductory explanation only and not formal legal advice. This firm accepts no liability or any responsibility for any statement made.

Contact us today. We can help.

Defects and non-compliances in Italian property purchases

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Defects and non-compliancesItalian property purchases – What’s the legal position when it comes to defects and non-compliances?

During our legal careers, my father and I have dealt with all sorts of seemingly improbable scenarios. The couple from Scotland who discovered they had bought a property that didn’t actually legally belong to the vendor. The German family, who arrived in Tuscany for their first holiday at their recently purchased dream property to find the previous owner’s brother and family in residence. It transpired that the brother was a co-owner of the property, who had no idea the property had been ‘sold’. Read more

Selling properties in Italy? What you should know.

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20Selling properties in Italy can often be a difficult and lengthy process, so it is important to make things easier for yourself by preparing and understanding what’s involved. The first stage is to put the property on the market, either as a private sale or though an estate agency.

If you are considering appointing an Italian real estate agent, it is important to ensure that the agent is qualified and registered with the local Chamber of Commerce in full compliance with Italian law. Read more

Power of Attorney

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ImmagineAs a solicitor, I am often engaged to act on behalf of my clients in very important legal matters. My clients trust me, my knowledge and experience to handle their affairs by giving me a Power of Attorney. You may have heard of a Power of Attorney, but do you know exactly what its purpose is or when it is used?

In order to shed a little light on the subject, here are a few basic facts about a Power of Attorney together with the legal ramifications as they pertain to purchasing and/or inheriting real estate property in Italy Read more

Italian conveyancing process: the lawyer’s role

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This post is intended as a general guide. For more comprehensive information on Italian conveyancing process, you might like to read our Property Buying Guide. If you are in doubt about any specific issue, please contact me or consult your lawyer.37

Conveyancing is the legal transfer of property ownership from vendor to buyer. It starts when your formal offer – Proposta in italian, on a property is accepted and finishes once you have signed the deed of sale, Atto di Vendita, at completion. Read more

Hidden Defects in an Italian Property

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Hidden Defects in an Italian Property… Buyers Beware!

Where exactly do you stand if you discover major hidden defects with your Italian property following completion? You move into your dream Italian home only to find that the condition of the property is significantly worse than anticipated.

hidden defects

This is exactly the nightmare scenario the Wright family in Lazio found themselves in. The day after moving in, the family discovered serious water penetration into several rooms in the house, notably the kitchen and living room.

Following their discovery, the Wrights raised the matter with the previous owners, who denied there was a serious problem; the particulars of the property had provided no information on its condition, and the Public Notary also considered that given the Wrights had signed a legally binding Proposta d’Acquisto declaring that they were purchasing the property ‘in condition as seen’, then there was nothing he could do. Read more

Reverse mortgage

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In December 2015 the Italian Ministry of Economic Development signed a decree implementing the new reverse mortgage, a form of equity release financing.reverse mortgage

The reverse mortgage allows home owners over the age of 60 to convert part of the value of their property into cash using the property as security for the loan. The owner remains the legitimate owner and retains the right to live in the property. The reverse mortgage represents an alternative to selling the property. At the time of signing of the loan, a plan of repayments is established, just like any other form of personal loan.

Interests and related costs are refunded at the time of death of the borrower.

Should the owner decide not to repay the financed sum in advance, the heirs, who inherit the debt entered into by the deceased, have the following options:

  • Repay the debt to the bank and clear the mortgage from the
  • Selling the mortgaged property
  • Allow the lending bank to sell the property at market value according in order to repay the mortgage.

If the property is sold at market value, the heirs have the right to obtain the difference once the debt has been repaid. The bank cannot ask the heirs to repay the debt, in the case that  the bank fails to sell the property.

Another feature of the reverse mortgage regards interests, which can be refunded either at the time of expiry of the loan or at fixed deadlines. If the “refund upon expiry” formula is chosen, no sum is due to the bank during the loan. In this case, there is no insolvency regarding the financing.

The sum granted to the borrower is determined by:

  • the borrower’s age – the older the borrower is, the higher the percentage of equity release that will be granted
  • the value of the property used to secure the loan

If you wish more information on this topic, please contact us.

Rent-Free Property Agreement: an Overview

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According to Italian law, a rent-free property agreement is applicable where a party lends an item they own to a borrower in order that the borrower may use the item for a given period of time or for a specific reason. The borrower then has the obligation to return the item to the lender at the end of the agreed period of use. As its name implies, a rent-free agreement is entered into for purposes other than financial gain. rent-free property agreement

The most common examples of rent-free property agreement pertain to a parent allowing a child to live rent-free in a property.

Interestingly, according to the Italian law, a rent-free property agreement is not restricted to housing. All sorts of items can be loaned rent-free to a third party. This might be a car or gardening equipment. In general, it is not necessary for the agreement between the parties to be in writing, an oral agreement is considered legally valid.

However, as far as homes or properties are concerned, a rent-free property agreement must be registered with the local Agenzia delle Entrate.

Once a rent-free tenancy agreement is registered, the 2016 Law of Stability has introduced a novelty with regarding tax: it is possible to benefit from a 50% discount on IMU and TASI so long as the following conditions are met:

  • The property must be considered as the main residence of the occupier benefitting from the rent-free agreement.
  • There must be first degree kinship relationship between the parties of the contract (typically parents and children)
  • The property owner must own only one other house
  • The two properties in question must be located in the same Municipality

For more information on rent-free agreements, please feel free to contact us.